Dating the thera eruption artsy dating

21-Apr-2014 13:34

Friedrich, Bernd Kromer, Michael Friedrich, Jan Heinemeier, Tom Pfeiffer, and Sahra Talamo Science, 28 April 2006: 548 Abstract Full Text PDF Supporting Online Material This article published the results of our recent study to provide the most precise absolute date for great Plinian "Minoan" eruption on Santorini about 4000 years ago available so far, to 1613 -7 years BC.

It made the cover of Science in 2006, but the story behind starts 4000 years ago, or on a personal scale, in late 2002.

The paintings provide a lot of visual information that needs to be carefully analyzed- a fleet of ships manned by sailors allowing one to see how the vessels were rigged, how the crew was dressed, what they carried by way of tools and weapons; people in the community going about their daily activities, picking flowers, making religious offerings; two nude fishermen carrying strings of fish; young boys in a boxing match, etc.

Historians have been debating for years about exactly when the major eruption at Thera took place.

Quarry workers, digging out the pumice for use in the manufacture of cement for the Suez Canal, chanced upon some stone walls in the middle of their quarry.

These eventually proved to be remains of the long-forgotten town.

Before the eruption, the island was host to a sophisticated and rich, seafaring and trading society who was related to the Minoans on Crete.

Their city was totally buried under many meters of volcanic ash.

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The explosion, estimated to be about the equivalent of 40 atomic bombs or approximately 100 times more powerful than the eruption at Pompeii, blew out the interior of the island and forever altered its topography.

But a splendid visual legacy was left, most of it in pieces that are painstakingly being assembled by Christos Doumas and his colleagues.

The frescoes at Akrotiri are spectacular, were exceptionally well-preserved by the protective blanket of ash that covered them and their locations can be correlated to various rooms within the town.

The caldera cliffs near the site looking north; the Minoan deposit is the thick topmost layer including a 5 m thick base of fall-out pumice.

Construction is consuming the pumice layer from top down, and destroying important geological features visible in the wall. Two large, connected holes at the base of the pumce.

The explosion, estimated to be about the equivalent of 40 atomic bombs or approximately 100 times more powerful than the eruption at Pompeii, blew out the interior of the island and forever altered its topography.But a splendid visual legacy was left, most of it in pieces that are painstakingly being assembled by Christos Doumas and his colleagues.The frescoes at Akrotiri are spectacular, were exceptionally well-preserved by the protective blanket of ash that covered them and their locations can be correlated to various rooms within the town.The caldera cliffs near the site looking north; the Minoan deposit is the thick topmost layer including a 5 m thick base of fall-out pumice.Construction is consuming the pumice layer from top down, and destroying important geological features visible in the wall. Two large, connected holes at the base of the pumce.Archaeologists from France and later from Germany did some preliminary excavation in the second half of the 19 Century but it was not until 1967 that systematic excavation began at the site in earnest.